Skip to main content

Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

Click "More / Share / Borrow" for each clip's source context and citation link. HTML5 compatible browser required

Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
LINKTV 08/02/2013
Video from Aspen Security Forum: Williams: One other question about privacy, and read your statement from a former NSA employee named William Binney who recently told a hackers conference the NSA is putting together dossiers on every US citizen, listing who we have relations with, what our activities are. Is there any truth to that and why do stories like this persist that you are spying on all of us? Alexander: First of all It’s not true.,
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Pete Williams: Writing for a strikingly unanimous court, Chief Justice Roberts said many of the more than 90% of the American adults who have a cell phone keep on their person a digital record of nearly every aspect of theirs lives, from the mundane to the intimate. To search one, the court said, police must get a warrant unless there's a genuine emergency. A huge victory for advocates of privacy in the digital age. Shapiro: Just because the police pull you over for speeding, doesn’t mean they should have access to your entire life. Your medical records, your bank records, your photo albums, everything about your life that people now carry around with them in their phone.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Pete Williams: The nation's police arrest 13 million people every year, mostly for minor offenses. And for a century the courts have said police can search people they arrest to look for weapons and evidence of a crime. But today's ruling said cell phones are vastly different. Pete Williams: But today's ruling said cell phones are vastly different. They contain so much the court said, that searching one would typically reveal far more than even searching someone’s house. For example, it said the phrase, “there's an app for that, “ is now part of the language. And that apps a person selects can reveal everything from political affiliation to pregnancy. The justices said today's decision will have an impact on police because phones can reveal whether someone was selling drugs or even speeding or texting while driving. But the court said, privacy comes at a cost.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Tom Goldstein, Supreme Court Expert: This is the first privacy decision of the digital era. It was almost a shock, the breadth with which the justices were willing to protect private information on computers and cell phones on the internet.
Pete Williams
NBC News Justice Correspondent
KNTV 06/25/2014
Brian Williams: If the fourth amendment is supposed to give us the right to be secure in our persons, houses, papers and effects, if the police need a warrant to search through your phone, what about the NSA? Pete Williams: Well, that's a good question, of course. What the government would say is that when FBI comes to you, they do get a search warrant and that the NSA only finds the information and gives it to the FBI. The government is, also argued that this isn't a search because your phone records, the metadata is already in the company's possession, it's like your toll records and it's not a search. So that's the next case that’s gonna come here. And if this is any kind of a sign, the Supreme Court is going to be very jealous of protecting privacy.
Brian Williams
Anchor and Managing Editor of NBC Nightly News
KNTV 06/25/2014
Brian Williams: This case wasn't about spying, it was about the cops and whether or not they can search your phone when you're under arrest. The justices seem to know your whole life is detailed on the phone. So no search of the phone without a warrant. It's a rare victory for privacy. We begin with our justice correspondent, Pete Williams. Good evening. Pete Williams: It is surprising and it is unanimous and so bold, and shows this that court which still gives out quill pens to the lawyers who argue here is thoroughly up to date on smartphone technology. So many people now carry cell phones that a supreme court says a visitor from mars might assume they are part of the human anatomy. 12% use them in the shower. But it's what they can hold that made the difference in the ruling.
Showing 1 through 6 of 6
Page 1